Tag Archives: sharepoint

Do we *REALLY* know how much is spent on IT?

A tweet was posted by @MSETCHELL yesterday (mattianuk on EduGeek) about being asked to work out the cost of the entire network.

This didn’t strike me as a strange request to be honest. It just seemed to be a standard pain-in-the-backside, paper-generating, unread-report-producing exercise … probably needed because of some arcane bid proposal which schools sometimes get involved in to try to squeeze money out of any available pot or group. It is worth saying the businesses do the same thing when applying for EU funds, regeneration funding, moving locations, etc … so it happens all over the place.

I replied that

I thought that would be fairly easy to generate? Have asset library with original costs, calculate depreciation, etc

But Matt said he had a full inventory but not purchase costs.

It struck me about this being another example of where silos exist in schools, this time between departments of support / admin staff rather than between curriculum departments.

It also made me wonder what do people record in their asset library? How do them maintain it? Who is the ultimate owner?

At Learning Possibilities, we work based on ISO27001 : 2013 (part of our standard of working for a variety of contracts, as well as best practice) and knowing your assets is vital, whether they are physical, intangible or information assets. Whilst the standard is over the top for most schools it does clearly align with standards such as the Framework for ICT Technical Support (A school friendly Service Management IT Management regime based on ITIL v2 and v3, with elements of other good practices from areas such as PRINCE2 and LEAN).

An asset library should not just be about the make, model, serial number and location of a physical piece of kit; it should include other relevant information too. When you install a network in a school you spend a certain amount on cabling … this is also an asset that is often missed. Is the cabling infrastructure in your school suitable for the next 5 years? Are you expected to go Gig to the desktop? PoE?

I’ll be posting a thread on EduGeek to discuss this in more detail about what could and should be recorded but I thought I would set out the basic principles here.

  1. All assets have an initial value (on purchase), a replacement value (how it would cost to replace it based on whether you do like for like replacement or old for new) and a depreciated value (how much they are worth now with their value going down due to an agreed method … and there are a variety of methods).
  2. All assets have a set period of useful life. This might be set out when you purchase the device and be based on a variety of factors. Usually these will be the warranty and support periods for the product, how frequently it receives updates, an estimate on how long you think the functionality will fit your needs and so on.
  3. All assets should be associated with a purchase order, when a direct purchase was made.
  4. All assets should have an ‘owner’. This is the person who is responsible for them to the institute and not necessarily the person who manages them on a day to day basis. An example would be the MIS hold information about timetabling, personnel, students, etc but the SIRO is ultimately responsible. In the same way the iMacs being used in Music are ‘owned’ by the Network Manager, not the Head of Music.
  5. Assets have to be written off at some point in their life. This can only be done by an authorised member of staff.

There are probably more I could add, but this is a starting point for most people.

Some of the above information might be able to be held in the software you use for asset management. Some might already be held in other systems, such as the finance systems.

It will be up to each school whether there is any replication / duplication of the information held … and who updates the relevant asset libraries too.

From the above this should be enough so that the Head and BM can easily see what the value of the network is (in financial terms) and what the total direction is over a period of time, see what is about to be at end of supported life and what they need to replace like for like (in general terms).

Not only does this allow for SLT to plan, it helps them decide on whether maintaining a status quo with regards to IT is affordable or whether changes need to be considered on financial grounds. Changes on curriculum, or leadership grounds are a separate discussion, and that has a slightly different set of criteria and measurement.

There are plenty of ways you can check whether others you work with, as partners or suppliers, are following similar models … a basic tool for IT management. For us it is our work on ISO27001: 2013, but for others it could be ITIL v3 certification of staff, FITS certification,  ISO/EIC 20000 certification. At Learning Possibilities we ask it of some of our partners and are happily reassured.

Have a chat with your own school to see who manages what areas of assets, how the Facilities Management team monitor and write things off, how the Business Manager controls what is put down as needing covering for insurance? See what standards they look at when working with others?

 

SharePoint Saturday UK

It is lovely to be around folk who see the benefit of spending a bit of their own time being part of something larger, and SharePoint Saturday is a perfect example of this.

For those who have never been to this sort of user event before it generally consists of a combination of noted speakers for the beginning and end of the event, with a number of sessions from respected peers sharing their knowledge and ideas with delegates. And Saturday was no exception … This is a short summary and I will try to give a longer post when slide decks are available.

Starting of with a session from the excellent Todd Klindt talking about why IT Pros and Developers need to learn from one another, and swap skills … but the important thing was to try stepping out of your comfort zone. As an IT Pro he has a a fantastic podcast (which actually covers a good amount of his keynote) so I would heartily recommend you have a listen.

There were many streams I could have gone to, but I opted some more familiar things (in spite of what Todd suggested). As a Business User (my predominant role around SharePoint now) I am always interested in ways to encourage adoption. Kanwal Khipple gave a grounded session on how to drive up adoption of your SharePoint platform, ranging from ensuring project sponsors do more than just sign off the money through to using Sharepoint Heroes to be your evangelists on the ground.

Next was a visit to Alex Pearce‘s session about how to introduce Power Users to SharePoint. A whislte-stop tour around making the most of a SharePoint site around a particular function (in this case around managing invoices) it showed using creating lists, views, the importance of data in content types, using lists to fill in documents … and the best bit was making use of QuickParts in Word for filling in information into a document template.

After a short break I was in with Matt Hughes (the instigator of SP365.co.uk) where he talked about SharePoint branding and some of the tips and tricks around modifying your own master pages, what you should and shouldn’t touch (especially since some of the master pages will get replaced on patching / applying service packs … but those SysAdmins who have had to compile drivers themselves know of that problem anyway!) and where to find some good, free SharePoint Master Pages … including those from Kanwal Khipple from the earlier session.

After lunch (where there was a better chance to chat with some of the exhibitors / sponsors … many of which were a bit bemused about why a Business User / Power User would be interested in talking to them … especially one without a budget!) I opted to sit out the sessions for a chance to chat with a few of the other delegates … and some of the conversations where enlightening … whether they were around controlled assessment, the missing EduGeek site through to a good, long catch up with some friends.

A good portion of the afternoon was spent talking with Richard Willis of SalamaderSoft (aka @rpwillis), Sam Dolan (aka @pinkpetrol) and Alex Pearce (aka @alex_pearce) about developments in education, sharing war stories, etc …

Ok … it was a chance to just relax and chat, but you still pick up a heck of a lot in these conversations, from barriers to adoption or integration with other services, how to manage relationships with users and clients, changing trends or simply good, old-fashioned ways of making things work.

I did miss out on having a proper catch up with Dave Coleman (@davecoleman146) and Alan Richards (@arichards_saruk) and missed their sessions (which clashed as well …) but their blogs will have their slide decks shortly (if not up already) and they both regularly speak on webinars as well. For those in schools I would heartily recommend listening to Alan talk about the cost savings made through the strategic choices and use of technology. Those who have already read Dr Don Passey’s report on the Evaluation of the Implementation of the Learning Platform LP+ Across Wolverhampton will see many similar points. They’ll both be at BETT in January 2012 if people want to talk with them about many of the items in their blogs, or simply drop them a line if there is something you want to ask them.

Steve Fox’s session at the end looked at Windows Azure, integration with Sharepoint 2010 and some Windows Phone stuff … a fair bit around Business Intelligence really and showing how SharePoint Online is quite a powerful option … if you read some blogs about the session (or some of the tweets) you can see a number of folk questioning why people would use Google with this amount of options to hand.

Having started to come down with the lurgy, I decided to miss out on the SharePint and head home …

A fantastic day, well worth the early start and looking forward to watching some of the webinars which are coming up soon.

Well done to all involved with the organisation, the exhibitors / sponsors and to all those who presented.

But Sharepoint Is a Business Thing … We Are A School

Originally posted at Sharepoint365 – http://sp365.co.uk/2011/07/but-sharepoint-is-a-business-thing-we-are-a-school/ 

After reading the various blog posts from the great and good of the world of SharePoint you don’t need me to talk technical, about the architecture of the servers, about the importance of design and branding, about particular functionality in an education or business environment … so what on earth am I going to write about?

Well, I specialise in facilitation, introducing people and things, suggestions about how people can approach new technologies … oh dear … I am starting to sound like a special advisor to a Minister of the UK Government.

So where do we start with SharePoint? Well, I can tell you what it is not. It is not a Learning Platform. It is not a replacement for an aging file server. It is not a cheap way of getting Office applications. It is not a complex system. It is not a solution to the lack of ideas you have about how to manage your life and your work. It is not the only tool in the world that allows for collaboration. Ok … one of those statements is correct … and it is the last one.

Sharepoint is a complex, powerful, wide-ranging tool that can address a number of areas in your school … if you just sit and think for a few minutes. Go on … I’ll still be here.

Done?

Over the next couple of posts I will look at simple tools and simple ideas about how Sharepoint can be used to make a difference in how your school manages school business, and where possible I will make direct reference to blog posts that have already appeared to help you get a wider picture. Today I am going to talk about team sites.

What is a Team Site?

Well, we all work in teams in one form or another. We all tend to generate stuff during that work. Files, conversations, lists of information, meeting dates, minutes of meetings, lists of jobs / tasks … it can go on, and on, and on, and on … and whilst we all have years of experience of emailing stuff to one another, forgetting to email stuff to one another, emailing the wrong versions, emailing the wrong people, writing meeting dates in a paper diaries and then forgetting to change the dates when a meeting has to be rescheduled resulting in you being the person that turns up 3 hours early to a meeting and wondering if you have no friends because you are in a room all by yourself … go on, admit it, we have all been there.

So what is a Team Site?

Out of the box a Team Site has all the generic functionality you come across a Sharepoint site. It is a blank canvas, and one which is handy to play with to learn how to get around Sharepoint. But it is only as useful as you make it. So let us look at the needs of an average secondary school department, having a quick thought about a few important functions which go on behind the scenes and away from the classrooms.

Let us consider coursework for GCSE English. The co-ordinator will always have a massive job to do. This will involve the recording of coursework as it is completed, unit by unit, by each student, which teacher marked it, whether it has been moderated, who by, does it meet all the required criteria, have the results been passed to the Exams Officer, has it been selected for external moderation, has it been sent off, and so on. To make sure this happens there will be guidance documents on what each unit of work entails, where it ties into schemes of work and resources, staff training on particular units and resources, staff training on moderation, feedback sessions between senior teachers in the department and other teachers …

Where does this fit into Sharepoint then? And let us keep this as simple as we can to start with (no InfoPath or workflows yet).

The Team Site is available to those who teach GCSE English and to other key staff such as the Exams Officer and SLT. This gets you looking at permissions. It also means you are looking at who the data owners are (in data protection speak) and ensures accountability.

The Calendar is a shared calendar which can be used instead of a sheet of paper passed round with deadline dates. It contains the meeting times, dates and locations. The meetings can also include relevant documents just like an email attachment … but we will mention that again later. The meetings can have alerts so you know when work is due to be completed prior to meetings.

Now most logs and records of coursework and marks will be on paper or spreadsheets. It is the work of a moment to use a spreadsheet to create a list. The spreadsheet already has the information you want, or at least the headings. This then allows for records to be created or amended for students as their coursework as it is completed and then marked. The spreadsheet is viewable by all and creates an open atmosphere between staff as they look at who is late completing the work. It also allows senior teachers in the department to provide additional support to staff who are not meeting the targets or deadlines.

Document libraries will contain files, videos, etc from the exam board or versions of work to use for moderation comparison. These can be linked to within the meeting appointments rather than attached (see, I said we would come back to it).

And this isn’t even looking at Wikis … a fantastic collaborative tool for sharing best practice. And we also haven’t covered the use of discussion forums to allow for healthy and private discussions between the team without it being all email traffic and the risk of emails being spread outside of those who need to be involved.

Now, none of this is exactly rocket science, has been mentioned by many other educational sharepoint enthusiasts, it is flexible enough to allow schools and departments to say “actually … I like the list bit and the discussion bit, but we already meet on a regular basis so no need for that” and it is powerful enough to have more functionality to add as people become more adept at using the team site.

So, there we have it. Team Sites and why a business tool can mean effective and improved management of a secondary school English department.

No such thing as a free ride!

Well … people keep telling me that and then pointing me at Open Source software (I like OSS, agree with OSS and want people to use more, but it is not the be all and end all!)
 
When many people talk about OSS they forget that it is FOSS that is actually important. The missing word from the acronym is ‘Free’ and there are a lot of options available out there for adding free tools into your existing sharepoint site.
 
A few good examples I have come across so far all tend to involve small widgets  you generate a tool that can be embedded into you pages.
 
Let’s take Voki as a start. www.voki.com allows you to create free, speaking avatars. I have one welcoming people on this blog and it is simple to create. Register yourself, choose a character, choose your background and enter your text. You might have to enter words phonetically but it can be fun trying out what you can make it say in the different accents.
 
Take the created code and paste it into a content editor web part (add it via the source editor rather than the rich text editor), save and publish .. hey presto, you have a talking introduction to your page. A nice way to welcome your students or others taking part in a project. Of course, Voki can do so much more as well … but half the fun is exploring.
 
I hope to include a number of other examples in the coming weeks and these will be based around others shared with me by regulars of www.edtechroundup.com. Please feel free to add your suggestions as comments and we can collate them all together.