Tag Archives: iPhone

And the winner is … iOS6

Today was another peak in the circus of an Apple Fanboi!

The Apple World Wide Developer Conference always has some interesting things to see and today’s keynote was no different. There will always be some hype, some disappointment, some pragmatism and some anger … and different people will feel it about different things, even within the realm of Apple Fandom.

To be honest, there was nothing which was too unexpected. We saw some hardware improvements in the Pro notebook range, tweaks in the consumer (albeit expensive consumer) notebook range and a some other hardware updates didn’t make it into the keynote but have come up on the Apple Store. Until we see the new kit in the hands of testers and real people it is hard to say what difference they will make but two key items on the top end MacBookPro are likely to be spoken about a bit … access to 2 Thunderbolt ports give you high speed I/O to a range of devices, from displays, external RAID enclosures, adapters for Gigabit Ethernet / Firewire 800 / fibre channel and a range of capture devices … and you still have a HDMI port for a second display and video output anyway. Couple that with the Retina Display and you have a device for video editors, photographers and so on … giving them one of the best graphics experiences for seeing their work. Of course, the debate goes on about whether some people can notice the difference with screens of this high calibre, and whether this is a marketing gimmick … and so we will have to wait to see what it is like when people start using the machines in anger.

We saw a raft of features spoken about with Mountain Lion, the next incarnation of OS X (no longer even called Mac OS X … a disappointment to those of us who paid for the original Mac OS X Beta). A number of these have been covered before as we are now on Preview Release 4. The strength which appeared to be taken from the new features seemed to be the accessibility tools (dictation, etc) and the portability of your personal settings to other devices. We have already seen the push for iCloud and how this links with Photostream between your devices … and this increase with iMessage, Notes, Reminders, Sharing and so on …

The key areas I am looking at with Mountain Lion are around AirPlay and Notification Centre. As someone who has a lot of inbound information streams there are some tools I use to manage this, but Notification Centre looks as if it could make a big difference for me.

And then we get onto the area that everyone was waiting for … iOS6.

With no formal announcement of an iPhone5 we are all looking to see what the new OS will do on existing hardware. Although we were told it would work on legacy devices back to iPhone 3GS, 4th gen iPod Touch, the iPad 2 and the new iPad (and yes, that is how Apple term it on their site) we do not know how much of the functionality will work. Siri will work on the new iPad we are now told, but will it work on the iPad 2? I doubt it … in the same way it doesn’t work on an iPhone4. A lot of the updates make more sense for the iPhone and iPod touch than the iPad. Moving from Google to Apple’s own Map service, Passbook for holding electronics tickets for cinema, flights, etc (possibly a lead into Near Field Communications [NFC] for using an iPhone for payment services?), improvements in how you manage incoming phone calls and notifications (it has only taken them a few years) … but the accessibility improvements have also seen me amazed that Apple appear to have really understood a need on the iPad. Enabling a parent / carer / teacher to only allow one app on a device as well as restricting touch input on particular parts of the screen seem to be encouraging using iOS devices with children. Engaging them whilst not overloading them.

An area of concern is the increasing integration with Facebook … as much as I generally trust Apple we are now in the situation where the ever changing preferences on Facebook will also have to deal with how that is applied with iOS too.

There is a lot to take on board with it all and I would recommend people watch Tim Cook take the keynote, if nothing else to see the difference between him and Steve Jobs, as well as a lengthier demonstration of all of the above.

As for what it all means for schools and education …

Hardware – Apple personal computers (desktop / laptop) are expensive. They can work out good value if you buy the one which is right for your requirements and you know how to get the most out of them, but in the present times of austerity this is more and more difficult. It seems to be that more schools are going down the mobile device (iOS or Android … and eventually Windows 8 !) and this is understandable. The lack of a decent server in the Apple hardware range does show that management of any Apple Device is not taken that seriously (IMHO) by the folk at Cupertino. A disappointing comment to make, but one many experienced Mac Sysadmins would agree with.

Mountain Lion – Again, the lack of mention of how the Server tools will work means that it will be interesting to see how the devices fit into a school environment. The increased emphasis on a personalised device, with settings and information following you around via Apple’s iCloud, means that there could be clashes in an education environment. The major bonuses for me come in the way of Airplay as a means of ditching the Interactive Whiteboard (until you are ready to make the most of them) and tools such as Dictation.

iOS – Again, the emphasis on a personalised device does work well with BYOD, but the increasing number of schools I speak with who only see the shiny nature of it or the cost cutting side … iOS6 will do little to improve or support the use of BYOD over iOS5. Until we look at the management tools and what settings can be applied to encourage best use of the devices … then we should still plan on making the most of iOS5. Siri is a major improvement, but like all information services (google search, wikipedia) information on its own does not give you understanding and knowledge … so we have to understand the most appropriate use (teachers before technology folks). Accessibility will be an interesting area to work on and develop, and how we make the most of personal devices as a tool and not as a cheap (or expensive) gimmick to generate engagement for the sake of it.

I am trailing Mountain Lion on my work MacBookPro (starting to get on a bit but should be serviceable) and will put my thoughts on this blog as I discover things I like or loathe, or if I spot things that could be fun in the classroom, or things which could help a teacher or SLT change / improve their working life.

I will also be testing iOS6 on an iPad2 (my own one) to see what apps do and don’t work, to try to see if we can lock it down and tweak settings, and to see if there are restrictions on some functionality … hopefully helping people work out whether they need to go for the new iPad or if they can get away with a cheaper iPad 2.

If you have any particular areas you want me to test or try out then let me know. You lot are going to be more inventive than I am for a lot of this because you are pushing the limits in class already.

The Data Protection Interlude – Apple

And so I take a quick interlude from my look at the recent Apple Workshops to think about a few queries some schools have raised in the last few weeks about Apple and Data Protection.

When it comes to their OS X devices (desktops and laptops) Apple have had some built in encryption for some time. FileVault was introduced in Mac OS X 10.3 and used to just encrypt user files. Not a perfect solution but the introduction of FileVault 2 in Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion) we now have a solution to encrypt the whole drive. The ICO has raised the need to encrypt laptops so if you have personal data on your MacBook then you should seriously look at FileVault for encryption. There are other commercial offerings and solutions which cover a variety of platforms, allowing for better audit and control … but yes, there are going to be at some cost. In the same way that BitLocker is a fantastic way to deal with the issue on Windows 7 laptops (which has been blogged about by the Microsoft Education UK team) then it is good to consider making use of the built-in tools provided by Apple.

When we come to Apple’s mobile OS, iOS, and the newer devices being used (iPhone 3GS and later models, all models of iPads and iPod Touch 3rd gen and later models) then these are all capable of going onto iOS 5. By default these devices make use of hardware encryption. Apple say, “Data protection enhances the built-in hardware encryption by protecting the hardware encryption keys with your passcode. This provides an additional layer of protection for your email messages and attachments. Third-party applications can use the data protection APIs in iOS 4 and later to further protect application data.”

The growing use of iOS devices as tools for Senior Leaders and teachers in schools will mean that sensitive emails and files are likely to be on these devices and so you need to take appropriate action to protect the data.

Apple do have a larger paper about iPad security and from my perspective it boils down to a few key facts.

1 – Set a passcode on your device. This will mean that should someone repeatedly attempt to get in then it will be wiped.

2 – Don’t rely on a simple passcode. Whilst it is nice and easy to have a simple code of 4 numbers, it is not exactly secure. You wouldn’t have a password of 4 characters for your desktop or laptop to log into your school network so why do it for a mobile device? If you look at your iPhone and check the pattern of smudges where your fingers type you can see where you enter it in … and the direction of the smudge can make it easy to guess. Other mobile OS have a similar problem so it is nothing new.

3 – If you are using smart covers on iPads then make sure that you turn off the feature to automatically unlock when you open the cover. This sort of defeats the object of security. Fine for classroom devices but not for those with personal / sensitive data on.

4 – Tools such as the iPhone Configuration Utility (ICPU) allow you to create a profile for devices to change some of these settings. If you are creating settings for school devices or to allow devices to connect to school systems then you should look at this to force improvements. This will include password length, complexity, Autolock time period (I have mine for 1 minute and the maximum number of failed attempts to login before the device is wiped (mine is set to 4).

5 – Remote wipe should be available … either via management tools within the school or if a personal device then via iCloud with Find My iPad.

Not an extensive list of how to deal with this and there are some other really pod guides out there, but hopefully this gets more people considering how they use Apple mobile devices and take a bit more care.

(image : Padlock by Marc Kjerland CC BY-SA 2.0 http://www.flickr.com/photos/marckjerland/4254099567/)

Apple Leadership Summit – The Workshops pt 2

The workshop spent some time looking at the range of tools to support and manage iOS devices and so I’ll run through some of the areas which it covered. I’ll also try to highlight where most of us are when it comes to many schools trying to do ad-hoc management of devices. For the sake of short-hand I will use iPad to describe an iOS device … but I could easily say iPhone or iPod Touch.

The first things we are generally all used to using is iTunes. Those of us with personal devices or those who are using BYOD / student leased devices are likely to not see a lot of use of iTunes as it is done by the user instead. Some schools with only a handful of devices might be using iTunes managed from one machine to look after devices .

All devices, whichever method you use, needs to go through 4 phases and iTunes can manage all those.

  1. Activate
  2. Update
  3. Configure
  4. Sync

When you get an iPad out the box or when you do a remote wipe it needs to be activated. It can be done over the air (with the advent of iOS5) or it is commonly done using iTunes for many users. This allows you to set up basic things like language, country, enable / disable location services, connect to a network and restoring from a saved backup (an important idea to come back to later).  It is also possible to put iTunes in Activation-only mode so that the update / config / sync can be done by other users and other tools.

The iPad will then check to ensure that it has the latest version of iOS (remembering that it cannot restore a backup from a newer iOS version). You then configure the iPad as to how it will backup, whether it can sync over Wi-Fi, what it will sync (going into detail in the tabs for Apps, Tones, Music, Movies, TV Shows, etc), type of video quality (i.e. between HD and SD) and so on. In the general summary tab I personally think that people should have a good look at the ‘Configure Universal Access’ button as the use of voiceover and zoom can be quite handy for many learners.

Once you have the device the way you want it with the relevant Apps and media then it will sync, taking us through to the final action of setting up an iPad in the simplest manner, via iTunes. Of course, trying to do this for a raft of devices is neither practical nor efficient. The simplest method of doing this on bulk is to take one iPad, build it the way you like it and then restore the backup onto each new iPad as you activate it, which will go some way to automating the configuration and sync sections.

And this is where a lot of school stay … an ad-hoc arrangement where a HLTA or IT Technician has to build a new ‘image’ (well … backup an exemplar iPad) and load it onto the other devices. There is little ‘locking down’ of the machine and whilst it is a bit of a mess to cope with it can be a lot cheaper than spending a lot of time and money on the other tools.

There are some quick wins though. iTunes on its own will allow you to configure certain things but to really perfect a device you need delve into the on-device configuration. Setting up for home sharing can make it easy for learners to access resources shared via iTunes (always use a second AppleID for this in my experience) but the real benefits come when you look into Settings > General > Restrictions. Here you can turn off access to iTunes, installing or deleting apps, YouTube and even Safari … though Ned and co did warn us to be careful about this as some Apps make use of Safari to work. You can set the ratings for content, allow or block In-App purchases, and more. Well worth having a look at the Online Manual of iOS 5 for more information about what setting you can control.

And this deals with basic setup of the iPad. Fine for a handful of devices and there are some tools to make bulk restore / sync a possibility when also tied in with storage / security trolleys.

In the next blog post we look at iPhone Configuration Utility and who this will build a profile of setting for you similar to the manual job of using iTunes / on-device settings.

Apple Leadership Summit – The Workshops

There were 3 streams at the event and, although I really wanted to buck the stereotype and get more involved in the content creation stream, I really had to go to the infrastructure stream as there are so many questions and queries about Mobile Device Management (MDM) that needed looking into.

I blog fairly extensively about the last Leadership Summit here and here so I already had a good idea what we were in store for, and I have also done a fair bit of investigations already. The introduction of Lion Server changed a number of things, and newer tools which have been added on since are also changing ideas about how to plan and manage devices.

I’ve got to say a big thanks to Ned and the rest of the Apple team in the workshop. We all know that companies will toe a certain party line, and these folk are no different, but the allowances for healthy interjection from delegates, questions ranging from the slightly enquiring to the in-depth technical and still managing to keep the workshop pretty much on track meant that they had to field some difficult questions and gave some pretty good answers, and tried not to disappoint when they could offer no more than some basic “sorry, but there is no VPP yet” responses.

I’ve also got to say that there are some legal and regional things about MDM which were covered. The Apple folk did remind us that *we* have to make sure that *we* are happy that *we* are following the T&Cs, laws of the land, etc. The session was a technical one, not a legal and contracts one. There are differences about how we might opt to manage things in UK compared to US because of a number of facts, but the main one is that the Volume Purchase Program (VPP) does not operate in the UK so solutions which talk about bulk purchase and pushing out apps are technically possible in the UK, but not following the rules at this time! We did look at options about how to ensure you are fully licenced and that is another key fact to remember.

So, caveats done and we can continue.

The session started with each delegate introducing themselves and explaining what they were looking for from the session. It was good to see a range of primary, secondary and special schools, people employed by schools and 3rd party support firms, as well as representatives from RM and Jigsaw24. In general most are looking for ideas about how to deploy and manage devices, and about app deployment and the legalities behind it.

Presently we tend to think of traditional IT deployments of suites in classrooms, or we have started to move away from them to mobile classrooms. We then also have those who have gone (or are starting to go) down the one to one route to give an easy way of all being able to access devices (a common theme from the day, to be honest). iOS devices are slightly different and we have a number of options. How you plan your infrastructure is dependant on how you want to plan to use the devices.

We can split it into 3 areas. Device Sharing (closest to present day), One to One (mix of institutional and personal data) and User Responsible (highly personalised and almost anything goes). Once you have thought about which option you want then you can start to plan how to get there. Personally I think it is likely that once you start planning then you might find barriers to going down certain routes and you might have to make compromises … sometimes down to money, sometime down to the need to change the curriculum … it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try but there might be times you have to be a little pragmatic.

Looking at the methods of managing devices we can see 6 areas.

iTunes – which we are pretty used to with them being consumer devices, but with a large manual requirement

On-device configuration – where we use the settings on the device or on particular apps, again a familiar task with a large manual requirement

iCloud – again something we might be used to

iPhones Configuration Utility (IPCU) – a way of generating profiles which can be applied to one or more devices. Those of us used to GPOs within Windows AD or WorkGroup Manager with macs will find this fairly familiar and the idea that a GPO is just a series of registry changes, or in WGM generates changes to .plist files … profiles are pretty similar.

Apple Configurator – the new kid on the block which is likely to be key for many of us. It allows for prep for mass deployment, supervising devices and assigning devices to individuals within the organisation.

And finally … Mobile Device Management (MDM) – the full blown tool which makes use of a framework provided by Apple to do all of the above. Within Apple’s toolset we have Profile Manager on Lion Server (used in conjunction with some of the above where needed) and you have an MDM lite solution …

There are a number of good 3rd party MDM solutions out there and to some extent it is a bit like making the decision about whether to use middleware on your network to manage Windows, whether it be RM’s CC3 or CC4 or one of the other products out there (Viglin’s Classlink, CSE, etc). It also depends on the mindset of the school. If it the attitude is “lock it all down” then you might want one route, and if you prefer a more ‘enabling’ and user reliant option then you go down another path.

So … there we have the first post … with the above tools you can go from delivering a shared device in a library which can be set up quickly for each user as it is booked out to them, a device which has all the settings for email etc and just requires the user to finish it off by putting in their username and password, you can stop the buying, deleting or even access to various apps, or you can bulk prep personal devices but to get access to your wifi settings they have to ‘log on’ to a certain managed profile. Over the next week I will try to cover each tool in a separate post.

The final thing I will say is that, whilst not explicitly mentioned, it is important to have a decent infrastructure for the devices to run over, and a presumption that most of the management / config will be done on a Mac (some tools don’t require a Mac but the significant ones will do).

Geeking again

You know when you are a geek when you are listening to a podcast on your phone, you hear about a tool to allow you to post to your wordpress blog and so you have to go and try it.

Well I did and here it is. It means that I can draft some ideas during the day and then post them once I have things refined.

I am also looking at tools to do this to a sharepoint based blog I use too, but one step at a time.