Tag Archives: google

DIGITAL PARENTING – TEACHING CHILDREN ABOUT TECHNOLOGY AND THE RISKS

(originally posted for Mobile Guardian)

We always welcome working with schools on eSafety, especially when it comes with supporting agencies and schools in their delivery of Get Safe Online. That is one reason why Tony Sheppard, our new Technology Manager, took a trip to Chesterfield last week as Chesterfield Safer Neighbourhood Team were invited into one of the local Junior Schools.

Supporting the Get Safe Online programme is an important part in our role of providing tools to support technology in schools and ensure the same ethos of classroom management can be applied with or without mobile devices and stop technology being a barrier to learning by giving ownership and control to teachers where appropriate.”

It is not just about turning technology off or blocking inappropriate content, but also about helping schools, parents and children make appropriate decisions in the all-encompassing digital environment.

Whilst the Safer Neighbourhood Team covered the stats and facts, the laws and the wherefores, Tony talked about the difficult task parents face with connecting with their children about technology and the risks.

“When we talk about Digital Parenting, we are really just talking about Parenting. We have to remember that magic triangle for Parental Engagement.”

Parental Engagement Triangle

(Becta: Exploiting ICT for Parental Engagement, May 2008).

“For most parents the important area is dialogue between them and their children. When we think about where we get advice about parenting, in general, we have a large number of options for us. School, family, friends, local services (such as the library or community services), online … and from our children themselves. Remembering that Monday was World Mental Health Day, it is important to remember that listening is an important part of parenting.”

Childnet has produced a number of suggestions for conversation starters with children

  • Ask your children to tell you about the sites they like to visit and what they enjoy doing online.
  • Ask them about how they stay safe online. What tips do they have for you, and where did they learn them? What is OK and not OK to share?
  • Ask them if they know where to go for help, where to find the safety advice, privacy settings and how to report or block on the services they use.
  • Encourage them to help. Perhaps they can show you how to do something better online or they might have a friend who would benefit from their help and support.
  • Think about how you use the internet as a family. What could you do to get more out of the internet together and further enjoy your lives online?

Childnet also provides an example of a Family Agreement that can be used to support the appropriate use of technology.

There are many scenarios around family use of technology, and we can look at these over the coming weeks, partly because there is often direct correlation between the struggles parents and their children have and the struggles with classroom management.

  • The Nag Factor
  • The Unexpected Gift
  • Always Switched On
  • Don’t Ever Switch It Off
  • Compromising Photo
  • But Just How Much Are You Costing Me?
  • The Packet Of Crisps

Once you have thought about what you want to do with technology, and how it is going to be used, only then do you think about what technical controls you need to put in place and who provides them.

The latest edition of Vodafone’s Digital Parenting magazine also provides a wide range of advice and information and the magazine is freely available to all schools.

With parents, they need to think about their Internet Service Provider, Mobile Provider, home networks (controls on the router for WiFi passwords, timed access, etc.), built-in tools (advice from Microsoft, Apple, etc.) and Commercial tools (covering timed access and location controls, web filtering, control which applications can be used, control installation / deletion / in-app purchases).

The same questions can be asked within schools and it is always best to be proactive about making sure the tools you choose match how you manage your classrooms and manage the learning.

At Mobile Guardian we provide a home MDM and parental dashboard, as standard, to all parents at school utilising our technology. That way parents can manage school and home owned devices – for free!

To find out more, ask your school about Mobile Guardian and follow us on Twitter to keep up to date with all our safeguarding tips.

Opening up your options…

In these days of strain budgets, restricted investment and and tough decisions we have a bit of a bidding war to get the attention of schools. With Google Apps for Education being heavily pushed through grass roots and national projects we now see some of the counter-blow from Microsoft.

It was interesting to see today the report on the Microsoft UK Schools Blog, about the announcement from Kirk Koenigsbauer – Microsoft Office Division, which looks at changes to the price plan and offerings with Office365. In the UK we tend to still view it as Live@Edu  as the changes to Office365 had not really hit us here. The price plans have been a concern to some schools in various countries, especially when they start comparing them to other offerings out there which come out as no licence / subscription cost. It appears that Microsoft have listened to this.

The previous price plan meant there a was some cost for staff and if you wanted the extra tools then there was a cost for staff and students. Now, the A2 plan is free. This gives you the email and calendars, online storage, online share point, online web apps, IM and presence … and with it you now get Lync for video conferencing. Yes, there are still other add-ons which will have a cost, such as integration with your PBX, voicemail and so on.

This now puts it back into real contention with schools and I can even see a variety of specialists now offering to help deliver this into schools in a similar manner you get certified teachers / trainers with Google. Add branding, integration with your school Directory Services, pre-designed SharePoint templates … all of which you can do yourself, of course … and it becomes an interesting prospect.

So, what could be the downside. There are still questions about integration with your AD, as there is a cost for FIM I believe, and from a DM I had on twitter I am not sure about where it fits with EES. For many schools these will be moot points, but it could be a swing factor for a small number.

Overall … a good thing, but be prepared for fans of both Office365 and Google Apps to swing into action with why their preferred solution is the best thing. The key is to look at the differences and see which is most important to you.

Google Teacher Academy UK 2012

“I would like to thank my wife, my parents, my teachers, the cat from 2 doors down who walks across the roof at 2 am in the morning, the excitable children who need to be spoken to when trying to lift their friends up by their ears … ”

Ok, so it is not really an acceptance speech and that is partly because I wasn’t successful in my application. It is more a thank you to everyone else who has applied and shared their ideas and passion.

For those who are not aware of what Google Teacher Academy is …. it follows on from the brilliant practices of Apple Teacher Institute / Apple Distinguished Educator, Microsoft Partners In Learning / Innovative Teachers Program, EduGeek Conferences, BOF sessions at trade shows … and is a chance to have an intense day of training on tools from Google, sharing it with some of the most exciting educators (not all of them teachers).

And watching yesterday and today’s twitter stream (especially the hash tag #gtauk) it was fun to see others being as excited about I am … if not more so! Watching the stream did raise another interest thing … I was now seeing another bunch of people to connect with, and since my application was based on collaboration, so it made sense to create a twitter list … because even if only a few of them made it through I would want to connect with all of them and keep a track of what they are doing. I do hope that Google release a list of all those who applied because it would be wonderful to connect with them all … and in the meanwhile I will continue to update my twitter list.

Below is my video … it is very tongue in cheek and yes, you can take a variety of technologies and put them in there as collaboration does not rely on a single technology from a single company and is it is more about a willingness to connect with others.

GTAUK application

And so we get back to my acceptance speech … thank you to those who applied and shared … you have been gems, stars, providers of treasure (and hours of laughter). I know a number of people were surprised that I, and many others, didn’t make it … but have you seen the calibre of those who did? All I can say is “WOW”!

I’m really looking forward to the twitter stream of those who are going … You just know it is going to be exciting and full of gems.

BETT – Mr Gove’s Speech

It was interesting to finally get to an opening keynote at BETT and it turns out to be Mr Gove, Secretary of State for Education. Having read a few newspaper articles over breakfast most of us knew the basics of what the speech was going to say, but we all know and appreciate that, short of publishing the whole speech in a newspaper, there will always be some element of selective editing … and some important bits can be missed.

I did video the whole speech and will probably do some selective clips in a later post to highlight certain points but the key things (for me) can be drawn out of the full text which is available on the DfE website, which also has a copy of the video.

Over the last few months we have seen a bit of softening from Mr Gove on some parts of technology and ICT. The initial lack of any comment or ideas on technology were disconcerting for many, and the rawness of the demise of Becta, coupled with the scaling back of LA involvement, had hit a nerve with many. Whatever the good reasons for such a rapid change, it was detrimentally viewed due to so many other issues it was causing. The political flags waved on all sides and some tended to forget a key fact … lack of information and unsure direction was having a detrimental effect on schools who were delaying adopting good use of technology often because they were waiting for the next hoop to jump through.

Well, the core of the speech helped solve some of that. Some of the hoops are going. The Programme of Study is going under consultation with a view to being scrapped by September 2012. No hanging around waiting for alternatives to be formulated, discussed, dissected, tested, implemented and reviewed … but a quick change to let schools get on with doing what they know best. There is still a requirement to teach ICT, but no prescription about what / how.

And for the schools who still need help and support? There are plenty of folk who can help with this, ranging NAACE to fellow schools, commercial suppliers through to consultants, and a number of special interest groups. Comments from others at the speech ranged from “About time, we have been giving examples of where it could be better for ages” through to “Oh yes, another chance for people to profit at the expense of schools!”

Of course, it is worth saying that some of what Michael Gove was saying raises even more questions. The repeated bashing on about the ICT curriculum being poorly taught to bored children seems to a little away from demonstrations I saw at the show, from what I saw at the TeachMeet, with what I see in local schools. I am not saying there are not times when it is boring and mundane, and is merely hoop jumping for tick box curricula … we all know that some courses and work can be done that way, but it doesn’t mean that it is *all* done that way … and the knocking of ICT by some to promote other agendas (including Computer Sciences) seems to have been jumped on by our political masters. Of course, we can argue that this would not be done without evidence and cause, but I worry about the good being thrown out with the bad. At least now, after the speech, I can hopefully say that those schools who are still doing good stuff with ICT will continue to do so.

But Computing … that is the next big thing. Lots of reports abound about how we are missing the skills for this and the various groups working on dealing with this are coming from different positions. Ian Livingstone spoke at the recent Microsoft Partners in Learning event about the role of computing and creativity (linked in with the games and creative industries), with STEM ambassadors stressing the link with science … and naturally you will come across many IT Professionals who will push computing / computer science with a greater understanding on the use and management of computers.

I am not saying that any of these are wrong or any is more right than others, but it does come across at times as a bit fractious and people are grabbing for control … sometimes losing some of the benefits of joined up work. Recent discussions on the Computing at Schools group have shown this too me … people annoyed at the perceptions about others possibly charging for access to a robust curriculum, in spite of this being something that Mr Gove was clearly promoting … buying in resources, expertise and structure …

And so we get back to the core of the Speech. Mr Gove says that Computing is important … because lots of notable people and some important reports say so. No direction will be given on exactly how this will turn out but references to work from BCS (actually from CAS, which BCS are helping to co-ordinate, but supported by Microsoft, Google and others), mention of NAACE and talk about commercial firms providing knowledge and expertise.

Nothing on Open Source, other than an oblique reference in a section heading … no real mention of what it means and even possibly mis-representing how open source products can be collaborated on with developmental forks and code being rolled back into a single project … in fact the opposite of what he says about things being in a single document. Nothing explicitly about examples of collaborative sharing. In fact … you could say that this opportunity to mention the Big Society seems to have been missed as well …

So where does this leave us? Or rather where does it leave IT Professionals working in schools?

If computing is going to have a larger role in schools then we have to make sure that schools have ready methods of allowing computer studies / computing / coding to take place. There have been a number of comments to me that teachers in some schools (thankfully a small number but still over 100 in the last 2 years) have experienced problems with their IT Support staff blocking changes. Yet I know of many schools where teachers and children code on a regular basis. When asked about this at the NAACE conference last year I had to explain that there is no standard way of saying to schools, “this is how you do it” … because there is no standard for IT facilities in schools … not even in those with managed services under BSF.

And after the speech we know that there will be a number of different ways of enabling the different options for computing to take place in schools … in fact it is an important part of the speech … no central prescription … schools choose what they think is best. So the only way it will work is if IT Support staff and companies become even more flexible. It means ensuring that you are actively talking with other staff in school now about what they are planning, it is all about instead of saying ‘no’ to something tying to explain what the issues are, what compromises can be made and making people aware of the legal requirements which you have to comply with no matter how important the educational needs are. It is about talking to other schools in the same position. It is about taking part in the planning of the curriculum as well.

One comment that has stuck with me, from Miles Berry (Senior Vice Chair of NAACE), was that IT Professionals in schools are in a pretty unique position to work with teaching staff. Their wide experience of technical expertise, planning, scripting and understanding of UI almost makes them perfect to help develop what happens with computing in schools …

So I look forward to the next 12 months and what it brings to IT Professionals in schools and the impact of Mr Gove’s speech. hopefully it also brings more professional recognition as well as fostering closer working between them and teaching staff.

Searching for that elusive fact!

After reading Ray Fleming’s recent blog entries about writing blogs I was most interested episode 3 where he talked about getting onto the first page of Google and why Google was the important used engine in the UK.

We were also lucky enough to have Adam Bates, from Encyclopedia Britannica, come along to the Northants IT Managers’ Network where he talked about the misuse of search engines to look for images (mainly Google Images) and forgetting (or ignoring) the copyright implications.

When Ray first blogged about SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) and blogging I tweeted back about how would you do it for Bing… half in jest, but after thinking about it, it is now a serious question.

So, I am lucky at what options are available to me to try and spend a month without Google. I must alter my search bars to use something else and I think Bing and Yahoo will take to the fore, but I am looking for other suggestions too.

If you want to look for something specific where do you go? For news I would tend to go for BBC or Sky, sport is BBC or Sky, pictures I would go to Flickr… and so on.

Please feel free to add your suggestions and I will blog each day to let you know how it goes…. Now to work out how to change Safari on iPhone to use something other than google.