The changing face of Data

Change never stops. There is always something else. Kyu Shin Do. Kaizen.

The latest thing I have a chance to work on, is to support schools as they get to grips with the changes that GDPR brings. But isn’t this another piece of red tape that will be a burden to schools? Well, yes, there are additional things schools will be obliged to do, but many things they should be doing already, if they are taking data protection and information handling seriously in the first place.

About 10 years ago I was sat on a working group for Becta, looking at Information Handling and Data Protection, and a lot of the advice was pretty full of common sense and those schools that picked it up, updated practices as further advice from the ICO was released and generally kept abreast of changes … well, for them the changes brought in by GDPR are an evolution, not a revolution … and this is important to remember.

Some improvements in processes; ensuring that you discuss with data processors about what they are doing with the data the school, as data controller, lets them process; having someone to have that oversight as Data Protection Officer; and so on … but these are all manageable with the right tools.

However, some schools are not up to speed. Some schools have only seen the scare headlines in some of the more sensationalist press (I won’t even link to them, they are that annoying and wrong). Some schools are being promised silver bullet solutions or are being told it will cost extortionate amounts of money to get the right experts in. In short, for some it is the Wild West.

It doesn’t need to be. There is good advice out there. There are people working to right the wrongs caused by these myths. The ICO has even started a series of blog posts around debunking these myths.

GDPR in Schools have already started to help schools understand their position and what they need to consider. They have developed a tool to help schools manage and record what data they handle, who and how it is processed and, possibly most importantly, why they are processing it. And this approach, to help schools fulfil a legal obligation in as simple a manner as possible, is one of the reasons why I am happy to announce I have joined GDPR in Schools as their Operations Manager.

Over the coming weeks we will discuss more around obligations, some of the legalities, some of the myths and how we need to make sure the dog is wagging the tail and not the other way around. We will continue discussions on EduGeek.net’s Data Protection & Information Handling sub-forum, join in discussions on LinkedIn and Twitter (#GDPRubbish can be an amusing yet illuminating hashtag to follow), and continue to publish advice through our blogs.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to ask. Some questions can’t even be answered by DfE or ICO yet, but we will be there, on your behalf, asking the questions and pressing for answers.

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