DIGITAL PARENTING – TEACHING CHILDREN ABOUT TECHNOLOGY AND THE RISKS

(originally posted for Mobile Guardian)

We always welcome working with schools on eSafety, especially when it comes with supporting agencies and schools in their delivery of Get Safe Online. That is one reason why Tony Sheppard, our new Technology Manager, took a trip to Chesterfield last week as Chesterfield Safer Neighbourhood Team were invited into one of the local Junior Schools.

Supporting the Get Safe Online programme is an important part in our role of providing tools to support technology in schools and ensure the same ethos of classroom management can be applied with or without mobile devices and stop technology being a barrier to learning by giving ownership and control to teachers where appropriate.”

It is not just about turning technology off or blocking inappropriate content, but also about helping schools, parents and children make appropriate decisions in the all-encompassing digital environment.

Whilst the Safer Neighbourhood Team covered the stats and facts, the laws and the wherefores, Tony talked about the difficult task parents face with connecting with their children about technology and the risks.

“When we talk about Digital Parenting, we are really just talking about Parenting. We have to remember that magic triangle for Parental Engagement.”

Parental Engagement Triangle

(Becta: Exploiting ICT for Parental Engagement, May 2008).

“For most parents the important area is dialogue between them and their children. When we think about where we get advice about parenting, in general, we have a large number of options for us. School, family, friends, local services (such as the library or community services), online … and from our children themselves. Remembering that Monday was World Mental Health Day, it is important to remember that listening is an important part of parenting.”

Childnet has produced a number of suggestions for conversation starters with children

  • Ask your children to tell you about the sites they like to visit and what they enjoy doing online.
  • Ask them about how they stay safe online. What tips do they have for you, and where did they learn them? What is OK and not OK to share?
  • Ask them if they know where to go for help, where to find the safety advice, privacy settings and how to report or block on the services they use.
  • Encourage them to help. Perhaps they can show you how to do something better online or they might have a friend who would benefit from their help and support.
  • Think about how you use the internet as a family. What could you do to get more out of the internet together and further enjoy your lives online?

Childnet also provides an example of a Family Agreement that can be used to support the appropriate use of technology.

There are many scenarios around family use of technology, and we can look at these over the coming weeks, partly because there is often direct correlation between the struggles parents and their children have and the struggles with classroom management.

  • The Nag Factor
  • The Unexpected Gift
  • Always Switched On
  • Don’t Ever Switch It Off
  • Compromising Photo
  • But Just How Much Are You Costing Me?
  • The Packet Of Crisps

Once you have thought about what you want to do with technology, and how it is going to be used, only then do you think about what technical controls you need to put in place and who provides them.

The latest edition of Vodafone’s Digital Parenting magazine also provides a wide range of advice and information and the magazine is freely available to all schools.

With parents, they need to think about their Internet Service Provider, Mobile Provider, home networks (controls on the router for WiFi passwords, timed access, etc.), built-in tools (advice from Microsoft, Apple, etc.) and Commercial tools (covering timed access and location controls, web filtering, control which applications can be used, control installation / deletion / in-app purchases).

The same questions can be asked within schools and it is always best to be proactive about making sure the tools you choose match how you manage your classrooms and manage the learning.

At Mobile Guardian we provide a home MDM and parental dashboard, as standard, to all parents at school utilising our technology. That way parents can manage school and home owned devices – for free!

To find out more, ask your school about Mobile Guardian and follow us on Twitter to keep up to date with all our safeguarding tips.

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